Berkeley CSUA MOTD:Entry 42041
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2017/12/15 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
12/15   

2006/3/1 [Science/Electric] UID:42041 Activity:moderate
3/1     Say I have a circuit breaker that says 20A. How many watts can I load
        on it before it pops? I'm asking because every time I have a space
        heater (1500W) and hair dryer (1850W) on, the circuit breaker pops.
        \_ P = VI  where P is power in watts, V is voltage in volts, I is current
           in amps (A).  Wall socket voltage is a max of 120V in the USA and is
           220V-240V in some places elsewhere.  Can you figure it out now or do
           you need more help?
           \_ [80 column nazi-ism removed, helpful original 83 col text restored]
              So take *that* 80 col nazi!  --content quality >>> 80 cols retentive
ness and format advocacy.
        \_ P = VI where P is power in watts, V is voltage in volts, I is
           current in amps (A).  Wall socket voltage is a max of 120V in the
           USA and is 220V-240V in some places elsewhere.  Can you figure it
           out now or do you need more help?
           \_ [80 column nazi-ism removed, helpful original 83 col text
              restored] So take *that* 80 col nazi!  --content quality >>>
              80 cols retentive ness and format advocacy.
              \_ Come on 80 col nazi!  Rally, damn you, RALLY!
        \_ AS a rough estimate, and with normal US household power, you can
           say 100W = 1A, so you're trying to throw 33A through that 20
           circuit breaker.  Of course it's going to blow.
        \_ Isn't this high school physics?
2017/12/15 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
12/15   

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