Berkeley CSUA MOTD:Entry 54714
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2017/11/18 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
11/18   

2013/7/23-8/23 [Transportation/Car, Transportation/Car/RoadHogs] UID:54714 Activity:nil
7/23    Cities safer than suburbs:
        http://preview.tinyurl.com/m4lxcyk
        \_ they are not accounting for the dangers of exposing our kids to
           diversity and gay people.
        \_ And the future to boot:
           http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/19/opinion/19krugman.html
2017/11/18 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
11/18   

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2012/7/29-9/24 [Transportation/Car, Transportation/Car/RoadHogs] UID:54446 Activity:nil
7/29    Is it really true that we subsidize auto driving to the tune of
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        http://tinyurl.com/cars-suck-ass
        \_ You might have missed the point.  Hiring a chauffeur to drive your
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2012/7/9-8/19 [Transportation/Car] UID:54433 Activity:nil
7/9     http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2012/07/nice-guys-finish-last.html
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        \_ Alpha animals.
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               One of the better Freakonomics chapters was about a study
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2011/12/5-2012/1/10 [Transportation/Car/Hybrid] UID:54250 Activity:nil
12/5    "Eight Ferraris wrecked in million-dollar pileup"
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2011/7/10-8/2 [Transportation/Car/Hybrid] UID:54141 Activity:nil
7/8     Is there some reason we can't have mass market nat gas cars?
        \_ Not enough infrastructure for refuing.  Chicken and egg.
        \_ Not enough infrastructure for refueling.  Chicken and egg.
        \_ It has less than half the energy density of gasoline.  -tom
           \_ So you have to compress it, which results in huge explosions
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2010/8/23-9/7 [Transportation/Car] UID:53931 Activity:nil
8/23    "China's nine-day traffic jam stretches 100km"
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8/4     "China Plans Huge Buses That Can DRIVE OVER Cars (PHOTOS)"
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2010/1/8-29 [Transportation/Bicycle] UID:53617 Activity:nil
12/8    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2010/01/cyclist-sentenced.html
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2012/5/25-30 [Transportation/Car/RoadHogs, Reference/RealEstate] UID:54400 Activity:nil
5/25    Sorry suburban hicks, properties in walkable cities retain
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	...
2012/3/5-26 [Reference/BayArea, Transportation/Car] UID:54326 Activity:nil
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 11/23  "Warming's impacts sped up, worsened since Kyoto"
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4/6     Alameda sales tax is now 9.75%. that's pretty rough. sales
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	...
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preview.tinyurl.com/m4lxcyk -> economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2013/07/major-cities-often-the-safest-places-in-the-us.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+EconomistsView+%28Economist%27s+View%29&utm_content=My+Yahoo
Major cities often the safest places in the US, Penn Medicine study finds, EurekAlert: Overturning a commonly-held belief that cities are inherently more dangerous than suburban and rural communities, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that risk of death from injuries is lowest on average in urban counties compared to suburban and rural counties across the US The new study, which appears online ahead of print in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, found that for the entire population, as well as for most age subgroups, the top three causes of death were motor vehicle collisions, firearms, and poisoning. When all types of fatal injuries are considered together, risk of injury-related death was approximately 20 percent lower in urban areas than in the most rural areas of the country. "Perceptions have long existed that cities were innately more dangerous than areas outside of cities, but our study shows this is not the case" said lead study author, Sage R Myers, MD, MSCE, assistant professor of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine and attending physician, Department of Emergency Medicine at CHOP. "These findings may lead people who are considering leaving cities for non-urban areas due to safety concerns to re-examine their motivations for moving. And we hope the findings could also lead us to re-evaluate our rural health care system and more appropriately equip it to both prevent and treat the health threats that actually exist." Major cities often the safest places in the US, Penn Medicine study finds, EurekAlert: Overturning a commonly-held belief that cities are inherently more dangerous than suburban and rural communities, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that risk of death from injuries is lowest on average in urban counties compared to suburban and rural counties across the US The new study, which appears online ahead of print in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, found that for the entire population, as well as for most age subgroups, the top three causes of death were motor vehicle collisions, firearms, and poisoning. When all types of fatal injuries are considered together, risk of injury-related death was approximately 20 percent lower in urban areas than in the most rural areas of the country. "Perceptions have long existed that cities were innately more dangerous than areas outside of cities, but our study shows this is not the case" said lead study author, Sage R Myers, MD, MSCE, assistant professor of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine and attending physician, Department of Emergency Medicine at CHOP. "These findings may lead people who are considering leaving cities for non-urban areas due to safety concerns to re-examine their motivations for moving. And we hope the findings could also lead us to re-evaluate our rural health care system and more appropriately equip it to both prevent and treat the health threats that actually exist." Weblogs Disclaimer The views expressed on this site are my own and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Economics or the University of Oregon.
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www.nytimes.com/2008/05/19/opinion/19krugman.html
Blog: The Conscience of a Liberal I have seen the future, and it works. OK, I know that these days you're supposed to see the future in China or India, not in the heart of "old Europe." But we're living in a world in which oil prices keep setting records, in which the idea that global oil production will soon peak is rapidly moving from fringe belief to mainstream assumption. And Europeans who have achieved a high standard of living in spite of very high energy prices -- gas in Germany costs more than $8 a gallon -- have a lot to teach us about how to deal with that world. If Europe's example is any guide, here are the two secrets of coping with expensive oil: own fuel-efficient cars, and don't drive them too much. Notice that I said that cars should be fuel-efficient -- not that people should do without cars altogether. In Germany, as in the United States, the vast majority of families own cars (although German households are less likely than their US counterparts to be multiple-car owners). But the average German car uses about a quarter less gas per mile than the average American car. By and large, the Germans don't drive itsy-bitsy toy cars, but they do drive modest-sized passenger vehicles rather than SUV's and pickup trucks. In the near future I expect we'll see Americans moving down the same path. We've already done it once: over the course of the 1970s and 1980s, the average mileage of US passenger vehicles rose about 50 percent, as Americans switched to smaller, lighter cars. This improvement stalled with the rise of SUV's during the cheap-gas 1990s. But now that gas costs more than ever before, even after adjusting for inflation, we can expect to see mileage rise again. Admittedly, the next few years will be rough for families who bought big vehicles when gas was cheap, and now find themselves the owners of white elephants with little trade-in value. But raising fuel efficiency is something we can and will do. There have been many news stories in recent weeks about Americans who are changing their behavior in response to expensive gasoline -- they're trying to shop locally, they're canceling vacations that involve a lot of driving, and they're switching to public transit. For example, some major public transit systems are excited about ridership gains of 5 or 10 percent. But fewer than 5 percent of Americans take public transit to work, so this surge of riders takes only a relative handful of drivers off the road. Any serious reduction in American driving will require more than this -- it will mean changing how and where many of us live. To see what I'm talking about, consider where I am at the moment: in a pleasant, middle-class neighborhood consisting mainly of four- or five-story apartment buildings, with easy access to public transit and plenty of local shopping. It's the kind of neighborhood in which people don't have to drive a lot, but it's also a kind of neighborhood that barely exists in America, even in big metropolitan areas. Greater Atlanta has roughly the same population as Greater Berlin -- but Berlin is a city of trains, buses and bikes, while Atlanta is a city of cars, cars and cars. And in the face of rising oil prices, which have left many Americans stranded in suburbia -- utterly dependent on their cars, yet having a hard time affording gas -- it's starting to look as if Berlin had the better idea. Changing the geography of American metropolitan areas will be hard. Public transit, in particular, faces a chicken-and-egg problem: it's hard to justify transit systems unless there's sufficient population density, yet it's hard to persuade people to live in denser neighborhoods unless they come with the advantage of transit access. And there are, as always in America, the issues of race and class. Despite the gentrification that has taken place in some inner cities, and the plunge in national crime rates to levels not seen in decades, it will be hard to shake the longstanding American association of higher-density living with poverty and personal danger. Still, if we're heading for a prolonged era of scarce, expensive oil, Americans will face increasingly strong incentives to start living like Europeans -- maybe not today, and maybe not tomorrow, but soon, and for the rest of our lives.