Berkeley CSUA MOTD:Entry 54433
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2017/11/24 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
11/24   

2012/7/9-8/19 [Transportation/Car] UID:54433 Activity:nil
7/9     http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2012/07/nice-guys-finish-last.html
        A study at the Berkeley Marina intersection shows that people
        with nice asshole-cars break the law more frequently.
        \_ Alpha animals.
            \_ sense of entitlement coupled with willingness to pay fines.
               One of the better Freakonomics chapters was about a study
               done by an "honor system" vendor.  Exec floors = more stealing
               (who'd a thunk?).  Though from a less negative POV, risk
               philic individuals, that is to say less timid individuals
               are on average more successful. -phuqm
               \_ Who'd a "noun: a dull hollow sound?"
                  think-thought-thought is such a basic English,
                  ***I'd have (I would've) [I'd've wouldn't work]
                  thought*** that even a native U.S. born American
                  wouldn't screw it up, let alone someone who learned
                  English as their second+ language.
                  \_ English is a living language.  It changes.  Here's an
                     article on this very usage from some people who publish
                     dictionaries that dates it back to the 1940s or 1950s:
                     http://www.macmillandictionaryblog.com/whod-a-thunk-it
                     Also, you're a jackass.
                     \_ no, YOU'RE a jackass. Do you drive a nice car?
                        \_ I drove yermom last night.
                  \_  Moron, each of the strings in the parenthetical is
                      wrong; yes, and intentionally so.  If you goggle the
                      PHRASE "who'd a thunk" you will get OVER a million hits
                      as you will for "who'da thunk" it being a sentiment
                      having originated prior to the internet with the
                      intentional incorrectness serving to highlight the
                      POINT that the finding is not surprising (to anyone
                      with two brain cells to rub together*).  Jeesh, I
                      hope your extraordinarily low levels of perspicacity
                      are not representative of your entire generation.
                      (* and yes, before you break into a biology lecture,
                       that is not meant to be strictly correct either.)
                        Dumbass.   -phuqm
2017/11/24 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
11/24   

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Cache (6429 bytes)
infoproc.blogspot.com/2012/07/nice-guys-finish-last.html
T Byram Karasu, a psychiatrist at Albert Einstein/Montefiore Medical Center who treats wealthy clients, believes all very successful people share certain fundamental character traits. They have above-average intelligence, street smarts, and a high tolerance for anxiety. "They are also competitive with anyone and have no fear of confrontations; And in contrast to their image, they are not extroverted. They become charmingly engaging when needed, but in their private world, they are private people." Earlier this year, researchers led by Timothy Judge at Notre Dame went some way toward proving Karasu's observation when they published a study in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology titled "Do Nice Guys--And Gals--Really Finish Last? The paper explored, in part, the financial penalties that women suffer in the workplace for being perceived as pushovers. But it also found a strong correlation, especially dramatic in men, between disagreeableness and income. Subjects were asked to assess whether they had a forgiving nature or found fault with others, whether they were trusting, cold, considerate, or cooperative. Men with the lowest agreeableness earned $42,113 in a given year; Disagreeableness was also correlated to job responsibility and recommendations for the management track. Piff's most notorious research seemed to demonstrate the extent to which people with money behave as if the world revolves around them. Last year, he spent three months hanging out at the intersection of Interstate 80 and Lincoln Highway, near the Berkeley Marina. Piff and his research team would stake out the intersection at rush hour, crouching behind a bank of shrubs near the Sea Breeze Market and Deli, and catalogue the cars that came by, giving each vehicle a grade from one to five. A third of people who drove grade-five cars, Piff found, rolled into the intersection without first coming to a complete stop--a violation, he reminds readers in his PNAS study, of the California Vehicle Code. "Upper-class drivers were the most likely to cut off other vehicles even when controlling for time of day, driver's perceived sex, and amount of traffic." When Piff designed a similar experiment to test drivers' regard for pedestrians, in which a researcher would enter a zebra crossing as a car approached it, the results were more staggering. fully half the grade-five cars cruised right into the crosswalk. Looking at the data from the heart monitors, Stellar found a direct, negative correlation in biological terms between class and compassion. "Lower-class individuals showed greater heart-rate deceleration in response to the suffering of others," Stellar wrote. The heart rates of the upper-class subjects generally did not change. There's the Horatio Alger myth, in which a person with grit, ingenuity, and hard work succeeds and prospers. And there's the firehouse dinner, the Fourth of July picnic, the common green, in which everyone gives a little so the group can get a lot. Markus's work seems to suggest the emergence of a dream apartheid, wherein the upper class continues to chase a vision of personal success and everyone else lingers at a potluck complaining that the system is broken. T Byram Karasu, a psychiatrist at Albert Einstein/Montefiore Medical Center who treats wealthy clients, believes all very successful people share certain fundamental character traits. They have above-average intelligence, street smarts, and a high tolerance for anxiety. "They are also competitive with anyone and have no fear of confrontations; And in contrast to their image, they are not extroverted. They become charmingly engaging when needed, but in their private world, they are private people." Earlier this year, researchers led by Timothy Judge at Notre Dame went some way toward proving Karasu's observation when they published a study in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology titled "Do Nice Guys--And Gals--Really Finish Last? The paper explored, in part, the financial penalties that women suffer in the workplace for being perceived as pushovers. But it also found a strong correlation, especially dramatic in men, between disagreeableness and income. Subjects were asked to assess whether they had a forgiving nature or found fault with others, whether they were trusting, cold, considerate, or cooperative. Men with the lowest agreeableness earned $42,113 in a given year; Disagreeableness was also correlated to job responsibility and recommendations for the management track. Piff's most notorious research seemed to demonstrate the extent to which people with money behave as if the world revolves around them. Last year, he spent three months hanging out at the intersection of Interstate 80 and Lincoln Highway, near the Berkeley Marina. Piff and his research team would stake out the intersection at rush hour, crouching behind a bank of shrubs near the Sea Breeze Market and Deli, and catalogue the cars that came by, giving each vehicle a grade from one to five. A third of people who drove grade-five cars, Piff found, rolled into the intersection without first coming to a complete stop--a violation, he reminds readers in his PNAS study, of the California Vehicle Code. "Upper-class drivers were the most likely to cut off other vehicles even when controlling for time of day, driver's perceived sex, and amount of traffic." When Piff designed a similar experiment to test drivers' regard for pedestrians, in which a researcher would enter a zebra crossing as a car approached it, the results were more staggering. fully half the grade-five cars cruised right into the crosswalk. Looking at the data from the heart monitors, Stellar found a direct, negative correlation in biological terms between class and compassion. "Lower-class individuals showed greater heart-rate deceleration in response to the suffering of others," Stellar wrote. The heart rates of the upper-class subjects generally did not change. There's the Horatio Alger myth, in which a person with grit, ingenuity, and hard work succeeds and prospers. And there's the firehouse dinner, the Fourth of July picnic, the common green, in which everyone gives a little so the group can get a lot. Markus's work seems to suggest the emergence of a dream apartheid, wherein the upper class continues to chase a vision of personal success and everyone else lingers at a potluck complaining that the system is broken.
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www.macmillandictionaryblog.com/whod-a-thunk-it
But, just as often, it is heavily ironic: Dr Una Coales BA (Hons), MD, FRCS, MRCGP told us that ten years of binge drink is not good for you! Much more common are cases like this: A sort of socialism among the Monte Carlo class. Even the original line-up of Dinosaur Jr will be back on stage together this summer - who'd of thunk it? ventriloquist Edgar Bergen - who had radio shows in the 1940s and 1950s - as the catchphrase of his not very bright dummy Mortimer Snerd. But whether Bergen actually invented the expression isn't clear. At any rate, the verb is showing signs of escaping from its fixed phrase, and being used as a straight alternative to thought: Q: Your thoughts on playing the sold-out Roxy in Atlanta in a few weeks? Didn't sleep well, feeling a bit sick after learning that what I'd thunk was a rabbit that we barbecued was actually a corgi. We would have open reviews where the unthinkable would be thunk. And in a final development, Google has quite a few instances of the same form being used with the rare verb unthink (to put a thought out of your mind): Thanks for a thought that can't be unthunk. Posted by Marion Graefe on 26th April, 2011 * Hello Marion! I have used this phrase hundreds of times since I first read it in The Group' way back when. Tonight I used it again and decided to find out what book it came from. It took me far longer to find the answer than I expected - guess you had to be a young person in that era!