Berkeley CSUA MOTD:Entry 54085
Berkeley CSUA MOTD
 
WIKI | FAQ | Tech FAQ
http://csua.com/feed/
2022/05/27 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
5/27    

2011/4/15-7/30 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China] UID:54085 Activity:nil
4/15    "Special report: In cyberspy vs. cyberspy, China has the edge"
        http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110414/ts_nm/us_china_usa_cyberespionage
2022/05/27 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
5/27    

You may also be interested in these entries...
2014/1/2-2/5 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China, Politics/Foreign/MiddleEast/Iraq] UID:54761 Activity:nil
1/2     "What would a U.S.-China war look like?"
        http://www.csua.org/u/122i (theweek.com)
	...
2014/1/7-2/5 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China, Reference/Religion] UID:54762 Activity:nil
1/7     Are you from a family of Mormons, Cuban exiles, Nigerian Americans,
        Indian Americans, Chinese Americans, American Jews, Iranian Americans
        or Lebanese Americans?
        http://www.csua.org/u/123d (shine.yahoo.com)
        \_ Somehow she misssed WASP Episcopalians.
	...
2013/3/13-5/10 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China] UID:54625 Activity:nil
3/13    "China's Drone Swarms Rise to Challenge US Power"
        http://www.csua.org/u/zgz (news.yahoo.com)
        Before our drones dominate the sky, we are already losing dominance.
	...
2013/3/28-5/10 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China, Computer/Rants] UID:54641 Activity:nil
3/28    "Horrifying Video From China Shows Just How Suddenly A Sinkhole Can
        Appear"  http://www.csua.org/u/znh (http://www.businessinsider.com
	...
2013/2/5-3/4 [Politics/Domestic/Immigration] UID:54598 Activity:nil
2/5     http://www.csua.org/u/z5u (news.yahoo.com)
        "I hope no one uses the term 'illegal immigrants' here today," said
        Committee Ranking Member John Conyers of Michigan. "Our citizens are
        not illeg -- the people in this country are not illegal. They are out
        of status."
        How did this guy get himself on the House Judiciary Committee?  Is it
	...
2012/12/5-18 [Politics/Domestic/Election] UID:54548 Activity:nil
12/5    Romney is right after all -- our military does need more horses and
        bayonets!  http://www.csua.org/u/y3j  Romney for 2012!
        \_ I'd never considered Romney's campaign as an ad for Revolution,
           but I guess that makes as much sense anything else.
        \_ The tax cut removal is ill timed.
        \_ holy crap. This is scary. US troops are most vulnerable as it is
	...
2012/7/25-10/17 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/Japan, Reference/History/WW2/Japan] UID:54444 Activity:nil
7/25    http://www.quora.com/Japan/What-facts-about-Japan-do-foreigners-not-believe-until-they-come-to-Japan
        Japan rules!
        \_ Fifteen years ago I worked there for seven months.  I miss Japan!
           (I'm Chinese immigrant.)  More facts:
           - Besides cold drinks, vending machines also carry hot drinks like
             hot tea and corn soup.  And they are actually hot instead of warm.
	...
2012/3/2-26 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China] UID:54325 Activity:nil
3/2     I just came back from Asia and I'm completely convinced that
        it is where economic boom will really happen in the next decade.
        What's a good web site to learn Chinese?
	...
2011/12/2-2012/2/6 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China] UID:54247 Activity:nil
12/2    "Students Uncover China Nuke Tunnels"
        http://www.csua.org/u/uv7 (news.yahoo.com)
        ~3000 miles of tunnel network.
        \_ WaPo article on same:
           http://csua.org/u/uwn
	...
2011/12/20-2012/2/6 [Politics/Foreign/Asia/China, Computer/Rants] UID:54268 Activity:nil
12/20   A higher percentage of people in China than in Pakintan have an
        unfavorable view of China:
        http://www.pewglobal.org/database/?indicator=24&response=Unfavorable
        Go figure.
        \_ damn these self critical liberals!
	...
Cache (8192 bytes)
news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110414/ts_nm/us_china_usa_cyberespionage
Reuters * By Brian Grow and Mark Hosenball Brian Grow And Mark Hosenball - Thu Apr 14, 8:15 am ET ATLANTA (Reuters) - As America and China grow more economically and financially intertwined, the two nations have also stepped up spying on each other. Today, most of that is done electronically, with computers rather than listening devices in chandeliers or human moles in tuxedos. And at the moment, many experts believe China may have gained the upper hand. Though it is difficult to ascertain the true extent of America's own capabilities and activities in this arena, a series of secret diplomatic cables as well as interviews with experts suggest that when it comes to cyber-espionage, China has leaped ahead of the United States. According to US investigators, China has stolen terabytes of sensitive data -- from usernames and passwords for State Department computers to designs for multi-billion dollar weapons systems. "The attacks coming out of China are not only continuing, they are accelerating," says Alan Paller, director of research at information-security training group SANS Institute in Washington, DC. Secret US State Department cables, obtained by WikiLeaks and made available to Reuters by a third party, trace systems breaches -- colorfully code-named "Byzantine Hades" by US investigators -- to the Chinese military. An April 2009 cable even pinpoints the attacks to a specific unit of China's People's Liberation Army. Privately, US officials have long suspected that the Chinese government and in particular the military was behind the cyber-attacks. What was never disclosed publicly, until now, was evidence. US efforts to halt Byzantine Hades hacks are ongoing, according to four sources familiar with investigations. In the April 2009 cable, officials in the State Department's Cyber Threat Analysis Division noted that several Chinese-registered Web sites were "involved in Byzantine Hades intrusion activity in 2006." The sites were registered in the city of Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province in central China, according to the cable. A person named Chen Xingpeng set up the sites using the "precise" postal code in Chengdu used by the People's Liberation Army Chengdu Province First Technical Reconnaissance Bureau (TRB), an electronic espionage unit of the Chinese military. "Much of the intrusion activity traced to Chengdu is similar in tactics, techniques and procedures to (Byzantine Hades) activity attributed to other" electronic spying units of the People's Liberation Army, the cable says. Reconnaissance bureaus are part of the People's Liberation Army's Third Department, which oversees China's electronic eavesdropping, according to an October 2009 report by the US-China Economic and Security Commission, a panel created by Congress to monitor potential national security issues related to US- China relations. Staffed with linguists and technicians, the Third Department monitors communications systems in China and abroad. At least six Technical Reconnaissance Bureaus, including the Chengdu unit, "are likely focused on defense or exploitation of foreign networks," the commission report states. The precise relationship with the Chinese Army of suspected hacker Chen Xingpeng could not be immediately determined by Reuters. A spokesman for the Chinese embassy in Washington did not respond to multiple requests for comment. But the leaked cables and other US government reports underscore how Chinese and other state-sponsored and private hackers have overwhelmed US government computer networks. In the last five years, cyber-intrusions reported to the US Computer Emergency Response Team, a unit of the Department of Homeland Security, have increased more than 650 percent, from 5,503 incidents in fiscal 2006 to 41,776 four years later, according to a March 16 report by the Government Accountability Office. THE BUSINESS OF SPYING The official figures don't account for intrusions into commercial computer networks, which are part of an expanding cyber-espionage campaign attributed to China, according to current and former US national security officials and computer-security experts. In the last two years, dozens of US companies in the technology, oil and gas and financial sectors have disclosed that their computer systems have been infiltrated. In January 2010, Internet search giant Google announced it was the target of a sophisticated cyber-attack using malicious code dubbed "Aurora," which compromised the Gmail accounts of human rights activists and succeeded in accessing Google source code repositories. The company, and subsequent public reports, blamed the attack on the Chinese government. The Google attack "was certainly an escalation of Chinese network operations against the US," says Joel Brenner, former counterintelligence chief for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. "Thousands" of US companies were targeted in the Aurora attacks, Brenner says -- far more than the estimated 34 companies publicly identified as targets so far -- a scale which Brenner says demonstrates China's "heavy-handed use of state espionage against economic targets." Many firms whose business revolves around intellectual property -- tech firms, defense group companies, even Formula One teams -- complain that their systems are now under constant attack to extract proprietary information. Several have told Reuters they believe the attacks come from China. Some security officials say firms doing business directly with Chinese state-linked companies -- or which enter fields in which they compete directly -- find themselves suffering a wall of hacking attempts almost immediately. The full scope of commercial computer intrusions is unknown. A study released by computer-security firm McAfee and government consulting company SAIC on March 28 shows that more than half of some 1,000 companies in the United States, Britain and other countries decided not to investigate a computer-security breach because of the cost. One in 10 companies will only report a security breach when legally obliged to do so, according to the study. "Simply put, corporations cannot afford negative publicity (about computer security breaches)," says Tom Kellermann, vice president of security awareness at Core Security Technologies and a contributor to the study. GONE PHISHING What is known is the extent to which Chinese hackers use "spear-phishing" as their preferred tactic to get inside otherwise forbidden networks. Compromised email accounts are the easiest way to launch spear-phish because the hackers can send the messages to entire contact lists. The tactic is so prevalent, and so successful, that "we have given up on the idea we can keep our networks pristine," says Stewart Baker, a former senior cyber-security official at the US Department of Homeland Security and National Security Agency. It's safer, government and private experts say, to assume the worst -- that any network is vulnerable. Two former national security officials involved in cyber-investigations told Reuters that Chinese intelligence and military units, and affiliated private hacker groups, actively engage in "target development" for spear-phish attacks by combing the Internet for details about US government and commercial employees' job descriptions, networks of associates, and even the way they sign their emails -- such as US military personnel's use of "V/R," which stands for "Very Respectfully" or "Virtual Regards." It's just hard to stop," says Gregory J Rattray, a partner at cyber-security consulting firm Delta Risk and a former director for cyber-security on the National Security Council. Spear-phish are used in most Byzantine Hades intrusions, according to a review of State Department cables by Reuters. But Byzantine Hades is itself categorized into at least three specific parts known as "Byzantine Anchor," "Byzantine Candor," and "Byzantine Foothold." A source close to the matter says the sub-codenames refer to intrusions which use common tactics and malicious code to extract data. A State Department cable made public by WikiLeaks last December highlights the severity of the spear-phish problem. "Since 2002,...