Berkeley CSUA MOTD:Entry 47535
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2018/10/21 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
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2007/8/4-22 [Uncategorized] UID:47535 Activity:nil
8/4     The worst bosses get promoted:
        http://urltea.com/155l (news.yahoo.com)
        \_ Likewise loud and obnoxious people get more recognition than
           quiet worker bees. It's been like that since the dawn of
           mankind. Nothing new.
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urltea.com/155l -> news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070803/od_nm/work_bosses_dc;_ylt=AtCX_KCZLEJoqmcXbZx5N6qs0NUE
By Rachel Breitman Fri Aug 3, 10:57 AM ET NEW YORK (Reuters) - How do people get ahead in the workplace? One way seems to be by making their subordinates miserable, according to a study released Friday. Click Here In the study to be presented at a conference on management this weekend, almost two-thirds of the 240 participants in an online survey said the local workplace tyrant was either never censured or was promoted for domineering ways. Despite their success in the office, spiteful supervisors can cause serious malaise for their subordinates, the study suggested, citing nightmares, insomnia, depression and exhaustion as symptoms of serving a brutal boss. The authors advocated immediate intervention by industry chiefs to stop fledgling office authoritarians from rising up the ranks. "As with any sort of cancer, the best alternative to prevention is early detection," they wrote. They faulted senior managers for not recognizing the signs of workplace strife wrought by bad bosses. "The leaders above them who did nothing, who rewarded and promoted bad leaders ... The study will be presented at the annual meeting of the Academy of Management, a research and teaching organization with nearly 17,000 members, from Sunday to Wednesday in Philadelphia. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters. Reuters shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.
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news.yahoo.com
News Home - 10 Help Welcome, Guest 11 Personalize News Home Page - 12 Sign In Yahoo! National 17 Business 18 World 19 Entertainment 20 Sports 21 Technology 22 Politics 23 Science 24 Health 25 Oddly Enough 26 Op/Ed 27 Local 28 Comics 29 News Photos 30 Most Popular 31 Weather 32 Audio/Video 33 Full Coverage Slideshows 34 Photo 35 Photo Highlight Slideshow A man wearing a smiling box hat is kissed during Kentucky Derby day festivities at Churchill Downs, May 1, 2004, in Louisville, Ky. The action marked the second time this year the federal government has intervened to alter flight schedules, and it is the latest example of the government injecting itself in the business of running airlines.