Berkeley CSUA MOTD:Entry 43945
Berkeley CSUA MOTD
 
WIKI | FAQ | Tech FAQ
http://csua.com/feed/
2018/11/14 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
11/14   

2006/8/8-11 [Health, Health/Sleeping] UID:43945 Activity:nil
8/8     http://csua.org/u/gnb (Wash Post)
        One injection of Special K permanently cures 5 of 18 patients of
        depression.  "It is almost like rebooting a computer."
        \_ ... "It is a chemical reboot, and the striking thing is the
           effect lasts for about a __week__" <----
           \_               ~~~~~ <-----
              "Half the patients had a 50 percent decline in depression
              symptoms after two hours, and by the end of the first day, 71
              percent reported a similar improvement. More than a third
              continued to report such a benefit after seven days, and nearly
              a third reported a __complete end of symptoms__." <-----
              \_ 1. It's not clear what the duration of the study was.  A
                    "complete end of symptoms" conclusion might be
                    premature.
                 2. The wording isn't clear.  That last sentence could be
                    interpreted as "a third reported no symptoms
                    (rather than just a 50% decline) after seven days"
                    without indication to its permanence. -!pp
                 \_ what about "a complete end to symptoms" isn't clear to
                    you?  Granted the reporter may be misquoting,
                    misreporting, and/or the researcher may be on crack (as
                    opposed to K), and the extreme claim deserves multiple
                    sourcing.
                    opposed to K), and it is an extreme claim.
                 \_ shrug.  I agree that I'm dubious as to the science or
                    whether the reporter reported it correctly, but I do
                    think that the article does make the extreme claim of
                    a cure for 5 out of 18.
           \_ What?  You expect you never have to reboot a Windoze box again
              after you reboot it once?
              \_ Makes you wonder if the other 13 subjects didn't experience
                 a permanent blue screen of death.
        \_ Ecstasy ROCKS!!!!  Special K RULES!!!! -Jeff Spicoli
2018/11/14 [General] UID:1000 Activity:popular
11/14   

You may also be interested in these entries...
2011/4/26-7/13 [Computer/Theory, Health/Women] UID:54095 Activity:nil
4/26    Is it correct to say that Godel's work on the incompleteness thm
        proved the Principia Mathematica wrong?
        \_ It didn't exactly prove it wrong; it proved that the true goal of
           PM (a complete and consistent set of mathematical truths)
           is unattainable.  -tom
           \_ Ah cool, no this is good. See ok yeah so the main goal of PM
	...
2011/4/27-7/13 [Health] UID:54097 Activity:nil
4/27    "Prince William involved in U.S. Coast Guard drug bust"
        http://www.csua.org/u/t77 (royalwedding.yahoo.com)
	...
2010/7/4-20 [Health] UID:53874 Activity:nil
7/4     Ecuadorians and DEA seized submarine specifically built for
        transoceanic drug trafficking:
        http://www.csua.org/u/r2a (news.yahoo.com)
        These drug lords are doing better than some navies in the world.
	...
2009/8/10-19 [Health/Men, Recreation/Pets, Health/Women] UID:53255 Activity:low
8/10    I'm the person who took care of my gf's sister's cat while she was
        away with the Air Force. In return, I asked her to check on my
        sons for a week while I was away. She skipped a day (and committed
        a lie of omission when she didn't say so but admitted it when
        questioned) and the upstairs bedroom was full of my sons' diarrhea all
        over everything (wooden floor, bookcase, blankets) - which is not
	...
Cache (3504 bytes)
csua.org/u/gnb -> www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/07/AR2006080701089.html
Shankar Vedantam Washington Post Staff Writer Tuesday, August 8, 2006; Page A11 Government researchers announced yesterday that they have had striking success in treating depression in a matter of hours, using an experimental injectable drug that acts much more quickly than conventional antidepressants. The study, based on a small sample, is part of a push by researchers to develop treatments that can bring quick relief to patients with mental disorders. Patients and their doctors report that it often takes weeks or months for most available medications to improve symptoms. Well, Well, Well: A Weekly Log of News and Notes E-Mail Newsletters Sally Squires Lean Plate Club: Build healthy living habits for the long haul, with recipes, exercise ideas and the latest dietary guidelines. Sign Up Now L Carol Ritchie Keep up on the latest trends, news and research with L Carol Ritchie's Parenting newsletter, delivered directly to your inbox each Tuesday. Much more work needs to be done before patients can see benefits from the breakthrough, the researchers said. Among the unanswered questions are whether patients will be able to tolerate the drug for long periods, and whether it will continue to be effective. Researchers said they hope the finding will prompt the pharmaceutical industry to develop similar compounds with fewer side effects that can then be tested on a large scale. Zarate and his colleagues published a paper about their findings in yesterday's issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry. In the study, 18 patients were injected with a drug called ketamine, which has been used for a long time as an anesthetic. Patients briefly experienced a well-known side effect of the drug -- a mild feeling of dissociation, where they felt disconnected or found it difficult to put thoughts into words. Ketamine is a controlled substance and can produce mild euphoria. But the dissociative symptoms disappeared within a couple of hours, and shortly afterward patients and physicians reported a dramatic improvement in mood. Half the patients had a 50 percent decline in depression symptoms after two hours, and by the end of the first day, 71 percent reported a similar improvement. More than a third continued to report such a benefit after seven days, and nearly a third reported a complete end of symptoms. Conventional antidepressants approach those kinds of numbers only after eight to 10 weeks of treatment. "We can truly raise the bar on what we can expect of antidepressant treatments," said Thomas Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health. "A modest response after six weeks is what we used to define as success. What I love about this project is it redefines success not in terms of weeks, but in terms of hours." Rather than go after the conventional targets of serotonin and norepinephrine, the new drug targets an entirely different neurotransmitter in the brain called glutamate. It is a chemical reboot, and the striking thing is the effect lasts for about a week." Permission to Republish Post a Comment Comments: (Limit 5,000 characters) Post Comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site.