Berkeley CSUA MOTD:2000:June:16 Friday <Thursday, Saturday>
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2000/6/16 [Politics/Domestic/Gay] UID:18484 Activity:low
6/15    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20000615/aponline154508_000.htm
        Man convicted of killing gay dog.
        \_ Those fuckers give a 404 for incorrect Referrer field in the http
           request; search for "gay dog" under "AP" to get the article
                \_ Worked for me.
2000/6/16 [Uncategorized] UID:18485 Activity:nil
6/14       \_ I see.  For near-sightedness, how does 20/xx translate to/from
              the number of "degrees" that some people use to measure near-
              sightedness?
                \_ maybe you mean diopters. there's only approximate
                relations between 20/x ratings and diopters.
                see http://www.lpf.com/source/rk/20something.html
                   \_ I don't know.  I was told that my short-sightedness is
                      simply "550", and everyone in my home country seems to
                      understand it.
                      \_ That's probably meant as -5.50
2000/6/16 [Science/Disaster] UID:18486 Activity:insanely high
6/15    Civil E question (since I'm no expert)/
        http://www.mtc.ca.gov/projects/bay_bridge/bbfin.htm
        The western span looks like a normal suspension bridge but what's
        with the eastern span?  Wasn't the whole premise of the bridge
        redesign to make it more earthquake proof.  I thought the old
        bridge collapsed during the World Series earthquake because it
        wasn't a suspension bridge but a regular type.  So why is 1/3
        of the eastern span supported on cable stays but the other 2/3
        not.  And why is there a bend in the bridge.  What's the point
        of making a road bend over water?
                \_ I'm sure anonymous cowards on the MOTD know more about
                   bridge design than the engineers and architects working
                   on the project.  -tom
        \_ It didn't "colapse".  One of the sections on the top deck fell
           down, which is what it's designed to do (be flexible between
           single pieces, as opposed to having a big rigid bridge.)  That's
           what the metal joints that make your car go clickety-clack are for.
           Regarding the bridge types, I seem to recall from somewhere that
           the western span was build as a suspension bridge, since it needed
           to be high enough for large ships to pass under, and that such a
           structure is the type that can be that high and long and still be
           flexible enough to withstand wind and quakes and stuff.  The other
           part is that the water under the East span is shallower, so they
           could sink more supports into it--look at a cross section of the
           Bay floor.  Anyway, weren't they supposed to replace the East
           span?  -John
        \_ two constraints, the end points, and a third, treasure island.
        \_ Have you driven on the current bridge?  It should be obvious that
           it's not a straight line from the road leaving the shore at Oakland
           into the tunnel through Treasure Island - you have to bend somewhere
           before the island, and you want a gradual curve, not a sharp turn
           that will become a bottleneck and source of many accidents.
2000/6/16-19 [Science/Disaster, Science/Space] UID:18487 Activity:high
6/15    Civil E question (since I'm no expert)/
        http://www.mtc.ca.gov/projects/bay_bridge/bbfin.htm
        \_ I thought Willie and Jerry nixed this plan.
        The western span looks like a normal suspension bridge but what's
        with the eastern span?  Wasn't the whole premise of the bridge
        redesign to make it more earthquake proof.  I thought the old
        bridge collapsed during the World Series earthquake because it
        wasn't a suspension bridge but a regular type.  So why is 1/3
        of the eastern span supported on cable stays but the other 2/3
        not.  And why is there a bend in the bridge.  What's the point
        of making a road bend over water?
                \_ I'm sure anonymous cowards on the MOTD know more about
                   bridge design than the engineers and architects working
                   on the project.  -tom
                   \_ geez tom, you sound awful bitter....  -mice
                        \_ I just have little patience for morons.  -tom
                           \_ Then why do you keep reading the MOTD?
                              \_ When ye berate thy first clueless sodan,
                                 then shall ye know, innocent childe.
                              \_ He belongs here.
                              \_ When thou beratest thy first clueless sodan,
                                 then willst thou know, innocent child.
                                 \_ 16th century spelling fixed
                                      -motd archaic grammar god
        \_ It didn't "colapse".  One of the sections on the top deck fell
           down, which is what it's designed to do (be flexible between
           single pieces, as opposed to having a big rigid bridge.)  That's
           what the metal joints that make your car go clickety-clack are for.
           Regarding the bridge types, I seem to recall from somewhere that
           the western span was build as a suspension bridge, since it needed
           to be high enough for large ships to pass under, and that such a
           structure is the type that can be that high and long and still be
           flexible enough to withstand wind and quakes and stuff.  The other
           part is that the water under the East span is shallower, so they
           could sink more supports into it--look at a cross section of the
           Bay floor.  Anyway, weren't they supposed to replace the East
           span?  -John
           \_ Isn't it bad to sink too many supports into the water? I
              thought you wanted a few strong supports and have the
              bridge be very flexible in order to help absorb the shock
              of an earthquake.
                \_ the water under the east span is shallow but there's
                   no bedrock after Treasure Island, it's all sediment.
                   That creates various engineering problems.  -tom
                        \_ Where'd you earn your CE degree?  Or are you just
                           playing one on TV?
                        \_ I make no claims of being an engineer.  I just
                           happen to know that the lack of bedrock on that
                           side of Treasure Island is an engineering
                           problem.  -tom
                           \_ Which is like saying, "I read something in a
                              newspaper article 8 years ago which was quite
                              obvious so I thought it belonged on the motd".
                              \_ Maybe you should, like, you know, read the
                                 fucking thread before you start posting
                                 idiotic non-sequiturs.  Since you seem to
                                 need the obvious pointed out to you: tom
                                 was answering someone's question.  He was
                                 not farting meaningless noise into the motd
                                 like it meant something -- that seems to be
                                 your gig.
                                 \_ tom does nothing but fart meaningless
                                    noise into the motd.  and since when does
                                    tom need an anonymous loser to defend him
                                    from anything?  he's been logged on and
                                    could've replied if he cared to.  i don't
                                    think 'non-sequiturs' means what you think
                                    it means.  (half a bonus point for the
                                    movie title, and another half point for
                                    the character name who first said it)
        \_ two constraints, the end points, and a third, treasure island.
        \_ Have you driven on the current bridge?  It should be obvious that
           it's not a straight line from the road leaving the shore at Oakland
           into the tunnel through Treasure Island - you have to bend somewhere
           before the island, and you want a gradual curve, not a sharp turn
           that will become a bottleneck and source of many accidents.
                \_ Two other reasons for a bend - they have to build the new
                   bridge around the old one, since they can't tear down the
                   old one until the new one is opened, and because not all
                   spots in the bay to anchor the supports are created equal.
                   Are you really so stupid you couldn't think of any one of
                   these three obvious reasons for a bend?
                   \_ Hello?  It's the motd.
2000/6/16-19 [Computer/SW/Unix, Computer/HW/Drives] UID:18488 Activity:nil
6/16    Solaris Question. Currently I have several diskless solaris
        boxes that mount thier root file system (/) from a rarp/bootp
        server. I have observered that if this server becomes
        unreachable, the diskless clients hang. In some cases the
        diskless clients won't come back even if the nfs server becomes
        reachable again. To solve this problem I wanted to have the
        diskless clients use a ram disk instead of nfs for their root
        file system, but documentation looks scarce. If anyone has
        done this before or knows a good URL, I would appreciate it.
        \_ Use cachefs or just go buy some disks already - there's no
           excuse for diskless machines in this day & age.
           \_ I'm using CP1500/CP2000 CPCI suncards and I can't have
              a disk in my chassis setup since it won't be field tech
              hot replaceable. I would use disk if I could. I'll
              take a look at cachefs. Thanks.
2000/6/16-19 [Computer/SW/OS/Solaris] UID:18489 Activity:very high
6/16    Is there a way for a user to set the DNS search domain on a
        UNIX (generic answer if possible; if not, what about sunos/solaris?
        linux?)
        \_ can't you twiddle around with LD_LIBRARY_PATH or something so
           that an alternate library containing a gethostbyname is used
           instead?
        \_ Short answer: no.
           Long answer: if you don't really need it to work for the whole
           domain, you just have a couple of hosts that you want to work
           then you can, for ssh, set them up with aliases in your
           ~/.ssh/config file.  For most other programs that use the standard
           system resolver (most of them, like ftp and telnet), you can set
           the environment variable HOSTALIASES to a file which contains
           aliases of the form:
           alias    fully.qualified.domain.name
           Note, this won't work for ping because it's setuid and thus
           HOSTALIASES isn't used to avoid security problems.  --dbushong
        \_ From 'man resolver' on Solaris:
             The current domain name as defined in the system  initialization
             file  resolv.conf can be overridden by the environment vari-
             able LOCALDOMAIN.  This  environment  variable  may  contain
             several  blank-separated  tokens if you wish to override the
           \_ Any reason this works on some domains (.ocf) and not others
              (several)? (as seen from a linux box; doesn't recur on soda)
             search list on a per-process basis.
           Works on Solaris & FreeBSD - think it's part of standard BIND -alan-
                \_ alanc: 1, dbushong: 0
                   \_ It's not a contest.  You learn something new every day.
                      --dbushong
                   \_ alanc: -5 for giving a non-LINUX answer!  Who cares
                      about that legacy Sun junk?  And we all know freebsd
                      was dead the day Linus, Our Lord and Saviour, wrote
                      the First Line.  main(){ printf("Linux Rulez! The
                      rest dr00l!!1\n";exit(1);}  /* GPL DUDE! */
                                      \_ You missed a parenthesis.
                                        \_ I think I made my point.
                                      \_ good thing linus wrote that first
                                         line and not you.
                                        \_ Not really.  It's the same quality.
                                      \_ ucb traitor. linux continues to be
                                         a toy because it depends on coders
                                         like you
                                        \_ LINUX R000LEZ!!  Y00 DR00LEZ!!!11
                                           \_ Windows is installed on more
                                              PCs than that crappy Linus.
                        \_ You must try harder my troll friend.  Solaris &
                           Linux were both first released in 1991 - FreeBSD
                           didn't fork off 386BSD until a couple years later.
                           Sounds like Linux is equally deserving of the
                           "old legacy OS that should get out of the way"
                           title.
                                \_ Solaris was a real OS in 91.  Linux was
                                   lucky to not crash on boot.  Solaris in
                                   91 was a functional and stable OS.  Linux
                                   was lucky if the login prompt came up.  I
                                   *really* hate historical revisionism and
                                   other forms of false comparison.  Linux
                                   never became mainstream and useful enough
                                   to become legacy junk.  It's just junk.
                                \_ Solaris wasn't usable until 2.4; I don't
                                   remember when that came out but it
                                   remember when that was released, but it
                                   certainly wasn't in 1991.  -tom
                                \_ I used SunOS 4.0.8 on a Sparc 1 in 1990.
                                                                --sowings
           \_ Thanks; works perfectly on bsd/solaris -- but for some reason,
              under linux, works only for some domains (eg ocf) and not
              others with ping [works for all domains via telnet]. Would
              be interesting to hear a reason...
           \_ they could set up their own chroot environment with its own
              hosts files setting the search path.
              \_ Can a user set up a chroot?  If you could do that, wouldn't
                 that make programs that expected to check trusted files in
                 /etc before going setuid insecure?
                 \_ No, and yes.  See chroot(2).
Berkeley CSUA MOTD:2000:June:16 Friday <Thursday, Saturday>